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We are very happy to be able to tell you a very special story about our construction site today. After the archaeologists sifted through their findings in the earth under the Puppet Theater building (Kolk 14), we would like to present six particularly interesting finds in this article. 

1. Unicorn tile

This beautiful tile is most likely from a tiled stove from the 16th/17th century.

It has a green glaze and shows the head of a Unicorn. The Archaeologists found it -like the other finds we present to you here -in the ground under the former foyer of the Puppet Theatre Museum.

Archaeological finds in Kolk Lübeck
© Department of Archaeology and Preservation of Monuments, Hanseatic City of Lübeck

2. Large piece of amber

Amber has always been popular for making jewelry. It is clearly visible that this specimen was sawn. A sign of a Jeweler’ craftsmanship. We do not know where exactly the piece of amber comes from. It is possible, for example, that it has travelled unnoticed from one place to another through excavated earth. Nevertheless, the idea of jewelry making in Kolk is a nice one.

Archaeology Amber Fund Kolk
© Department of Archaeology and Preservation of Monuments, Hanseatic City of Lübeck

3. Horse with unknown rider

This colorfully glazed tile is also most likely from an 18th century tiled stove. The horse’s head and bridle are clearly visible. But if you look more closely, you will also recognize a hand on the rein. It belongs to an unknown rider. The beard or a part of the hair of the rider is still recognizable.

Archaeological finds in Kolk Lübeck
© Department of Archaeology and Preservation of Monuments, Hanseatic City of Lübeck

4. Animal bones

At first glance, these animal bones from the Middle Ages seem quite macabre to us today. But in the end they are simply a mirror of the medieval diet.Moreso: on closer inspection they show us that animals slaughtered at that time were used more holistically. What today looks like a short horn is ultimately only the horn bone that was left over after the “actual horn” was used for combs, vessels and other objects.

Construction site in Kolk Funde
© Department of Archaeology and Preservation of Monuments, Hanseatic City of Lübeck
Find horn bones in the Lübecker Kolk
© Department of Archaeology and Preservation of Monuments, Hanseatic City of Lübeck

5. A different type of “button bar

The careful utilization of the entire animal becomes particularly clear with the view of this bone. In all probability buttons were sawn out of a bone here, because the bone is too flat for beads and too small for game pieces.

Archaeology in Kolk
© Department of Archaeology and Preservation of Monuments, Hanseatic City of Lübeck

6. Fittings of a chest

In the past, chests and boxes were often fitted with ornate fittings. These particularly pretty specimens most likely have a copper content that has oxidized over the years and now makes up the turquoise color. The most exciting thing about these two finds, however, is that this type of chest or crate fitting were also found in the founding quarter. This suggests that the fittings date back to the 12th -13th century.

Finds in Kolk
© Department of Archaeology and Preservation of Monuments, Hanseatic City of Lübeck

What happens now with the finds from the Kolk?

All of these finds are now going to the Archaeology and Preservation of Monuments Department, Archaeology of the Hanseatic City of Lübeck for labeling and inventory. There they are cleaned again and professionally dried against mold. If you want to know more about one of these exciting finds from the Kolk, leave us a comment and we will gladly forward your question!